Normally I don’t write traditional articles, as the name of the site is hockey recaps. I write NHL recaps and sometimes previews. But every now and then Puck Daddy has a beyond ridiculously stupid article in which the writer made no effort to research anything before they wrote about their topic. So today I will rebut two such articles, both involving the Anaheim Ducks.

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/nhl-puck-daddy/puck-daddy-power-rankings–stanley-cup-final–rick-nash–bruce-boudreau-152209962.html

Number four, on the above link, talks about Coach Bruce Boudreau and is quoted below.

About 24 hours after Elliotte Friedman suggested that the relationship between Bruce Boudreau and Ducks GM Bob Murray is “strained,” Boudreau was on Sportsnet radio and had a rather interesting chat on his history of losing Games 7.

The money quote here: “I don’t win them, and I don’t think I’m losing them.”

And that’s what’s important to note? Boudreau’s goalies in Games 7 have a combined save percentage — I can’t believe this is true — of .858. The goalies his teams have faced? .938. That’s right, an 80-point difference in save percentage. Eighty. The number of times his team’s goalies have cleared the less-than-league-average mark of just .910? Twice, and none since 2009.

Maybe you say that’s a coaching thing, but we know that percentages get weird in short samples. And I’m not inclined to believe that whatever Boudreau is telling his charges before the eight Games 7 in question leads to a reliable PDO of 92.0. That just doesn’t stand up to scrutiny.

Let’s put it another way: This year’s Ducks, despite their various flaws, got eliminated from the postseason having lost two just games in regulation out of 16. Are we going to talk about how coaching is to blame here? Really?

Even taking playoff OT losses out of the equation, Boudreau’s teams have won almost 65 percent of their games in both the regular- and postseasons, so maybe — MAYBE — he’s just a good coach who’s gone through some awful luck.

Let’s have some fun.

The money quote here: “I don’t win them, and I don’t think I’m losing them.”

This has nothing to do with Puck Daddy and instead is a rebut to Bruce. If you believe you have no outcome on the game, which is basically why you stated, then WHY THE HELL ARE YOU COACHING?!? Seriously, why are you coaching? You clearly make no difference so just leave and save the Ducks some money. And he’s right about the first part, he doesn’t win them, that’s for sure. Obviously, it’s a team sport but every person on the team does play a small role in the outcome of the game including the coach. The fact that he doesn’t get that is beyond me.

And that’s what’s important to note? Boudreau’s goalies in Games 7 have a combined save percentage — I can’t believe this is true — of .858. The goalies his teams have faced? .938. That’s right, an 80-point difference in save percentage. Eighty. The number of times his team’s goalies have cleared the less-than-league-average mark of just .910? Twice, and none since 2009.

Maybe you say that’s a coaching thing, but we know that percentages get weird in short samples. And I’m not inclined to believe that whatever Boudreau is telling his charges before the eight Games 7 in question leads to a reliable PDO of 92.0. That just doesn’t stand up to scrutiny.

Just because a goalie has a bad SV% doesn’t make it all the goalie’s fault. See basically any goalie who has recently played for the Edmonton Oilers. Do you really think Devan Dubnyk became that much better of a goalie, in a short period of time, to raise his SV% from his last season with the Oilers at .894 to his first season with the Wild at .936? That’s a 42 point swing. I think it has more to do with the team that’s playing in front of him than anything else.

But there’s two problems here. One is whose the idiot who started a rookie goalie in Game 7 against the Kings? That would be you Bruce. You don’t start a rookie in Game 7. I don’t care that he pitched a shutout in Game 4 and then played in Game 5 and Game 6. He shouldn’t never have played to start with. Jonas Hiller should have played every single game. You can pull him but then you go back to him. Bruce started up the goalie carousel and then played three goalies in two rounds, which is pretty much unheard of, by choice. A Game 7 is different type of game entirely. Which he clearly doesn’t get, that’s why he is 1-6 in those games. He had a very inexperienced defense. François Beauchemin was the only defenseman with any real playoff experience. Which means the other 5 have basically none. The Kings, of course, ate them alive and jumped on all their mistakes in the beginning of Game 7 to jump out to their big lead. Although having inexperienced defensmen isn’t really the coaches fault. It would have helped if you had an experienced goalie to try and mop up those mistakes but, of course, they didn’t. They had a goalie who just looked over his head. Which he was. The fact that he started three goalies and benched a future hall of famer and the freakin MVP of the Olympics, Teemu Selanne, for no reason showed he pretty much had no clue what he was doing. He improved greatly this season but it had the same result so big whoop.

It’s true you wouldn’t normally end up facing a Jaroslav Halak, who stonewalls you completely, in a Game 7 like he did when Bruce was coaching the Capitals against the Canadiens in 2010. But how did Bruce get to that point? And this is where Puck Daddy failed to do the research. That Game 7 wasn’t the first chance the Capitals had to put away the Canadiens. O no. They were up 3-1 in the series. Which means he lost Game 5, Game 6 and Game 7. Anyone in which a win would have closed out the series. So let’s see what his record is when the team he is coaching has a chance to end a series, starting with 2010.

2010: 0-3, Lost Game 5, 6 and 7 to the Canadiens
2011: 1-1, beat the Rangers in 5 and then was swept by the Lightning, ouch
2012: No playoffs
2013: 0-2, Lost Game 6 and 7 to the Red Wings
2014: 1-2, Won against the Stars in 6 and then lost Game 6 and 7 to the Kings
2015: 2-2, Won against the Jets and Flames lost Game 6 and 7 to the Blackhawks

So he’s total record when his team has a chance to eliminate an opponent, the last five seasons is 4-10. In actuality, teams that you are supposed to beat in four or five games like Jets, Flames and Rangers shouldn’t even count. Because if he loses those games, well that’s just sad. I mean you get hired to get a team over the hump and beat the teams that are as good or better than you. So while 4-10 is bad enough, I’m only looking at 1-6. Which is his record in Game 6 and 7 after he won Game 5 the past three seasons. 2011 had no Game 6 or 7. 2010 is worse because he was up 3-1 but we’ll just use Game 6 and 7 which is 0-2 there. So while his playoff record in Game 7’s is also 1-6 all time, we are going to subtract the last three seasons from that which gives us 1-3. Then we will add that 1-6 record for Game 6 and 7 the last three seasons and the 0-2 from 2010 and we get 2 -11. That’s right folks, he has a 2-11 record in Game 6 and 7 the last five years. That is freakin atrocious. Why the hell is he still even employed? Does the Anaheim Ducks front office really think he’s going to turn that around or manage to outcoach Joel Quenneville or Darryl Sutter? They’re out of their minds.

A coach’s job is too: Get his team to start the season strong, get his team to finish the season strong, make lines and then adjust them if they aren’t working, win playoff games, win Game 7’s and get the most out of his best players and get them to show up when they are needed most. He gets the team to start and finish strong, that’s one of his best coaching traits. Adjusting lines isn’t his strong suit, neither is winning Game 7’s or getting the most out of players. Its true that Ryan Getzlaf and Corey Perry disappear when they are needed most. Some of it is on them but it’s the coaches job to make sure they show up and don’t disappear to begin with.

Which brings me to this article, which isn’t as bad but is really missing the point.

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/nhl-puck-daddy/ryan-kesler-gets-ducks-further-in-playoffs–but-not-far-enough-185950192.html

The point being is that Ryan Kesler is insignificant in the grand scheme of things. Yes, it’s true. Some of the quotes from the article:

Kesler was a major reason why this group got as far as it did…
…They went further in the playoffs than ever before under Boudreau.

The only reason the Ducks went further in the playoffs this year than last is because the Los Angeles Kings weren’t in the playoffs and the Detroit Red Wings are in the Eastern Conference. It’s true. They’ve lost to five teams in the playoffs since winning the Stanley Cup. One was to the Stars after they won but the team was hungover and Selanne and Niedermayer only played half the season so that doesn’t count. The year the Predators beat them, they went from like 9th in the conference to 4th in a month thanks to Corey Perry. They really weren’t that good then though. The Red Wings are now in the East so they don’t matter anymore. Which brings me to the Blackhawks and Kings. They have won 4, and possibly 5, Stanley Cups the last few seasons. They are the two best teams in the Conference, regardless of whatever crappy regular season record they put together. And lately it’s been crappy but they don’t really care.

So does anyone think having Ryan Kesler last season would have changed the debacle that was the Game 7 against the Kings last year? No, it wouldn’t have. Does anyone think the Ducks wouldn’t have beaten the Jets or Flames without Ryan Kesler this year? No, they would have. Did Kesler help them beat the Blackhawks? No, he didn’t. And that is why he is insignificant or more importantly irrelevant to the Ducks failures of being able to beat a great team.

They need a new coach and a GM. The current coach can’t win important playoff games. They need one that can. They need Getzlaf and Perry to care and to show up. That’s half on them and half on their new coach. The goaltenders need more experience. Now that Jonas Hiller is gone, there’s nothing that can be done there except to wait. Last year my two biggest needs for the Ducks were, no not Kesler, a new coach, har har har, and an experienced defenseman. The defense played a lot better and Clayton Stoner worked out a lot better than I think anyone anticipated. But I still think they need one with a lot playoff experience. The problem is they gave up all their best trade assets in the Kesler trade. The lost Nick Bonino, Luca Sbisa and a top pick. This is why the GM, Bob Murray, needs to go too. He gave up too many assets for one player and didn’t get what they really needed. More importantly he still hasn’t fired his coach. And that reason alone, should get him canned.

Alex Mueller

Author: Alex Mueller

Alex Mueller graduated from Temple University with a minor in journalism over a decade ago. He’s been writing about NHL hockey, on and off, since the Fall of 2009. He’s written for Pucking Awesome, the Checking Line and now Hockey Recaps. He played goalie at San Diego Ice Arena. His first novel, Bobby Sterling vs Truth, is available on Amazon now.

http://hockeyrecaps.wpengine.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/bruce-boudreau-1024x577.jpghttp://hockeyrecaps.wpengine.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/bruce-boudreau-150x150.jpgAlex MuellerAnalysisAnaheim Ducks,Ryan Kesler
Normally I don't write traditional articles, as the name of the site is hockey recaps. I write NHL recaps and sometimes previews. But every now and then Puck Daddy has a beyond ridiculously stupid article in which the writer made no effort to research anything before they wrote about...